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Category Archives for "Health and Wellness"

4 Reasons Why Every Patient Needs a UGI Before Bariatric Surgery

While most individuals who undergo bariatric surgery are motivated by their desire for weight loss, many have other health concerns as well. Individuals with a BMI of 30 or higher have a greater risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, sleep apnea, heart disease, stroke, and some types of cancers, among other health threats. Many already have some of these conditions at the time they look for a bariatric surgeon. Maximizing the potential for healthy weight loss while minimizing health risks and hazards should be the goal of every bariatric surgeon.

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12 Steps for Success After Weight Loss Surgery

“83 lbs down and only 20 lbs to go until I hit my goal...I haven’t felt this great in years!”

“So proud of my husband Jesse. 200 lbs in just over a year!”

“Just got back from my 6-month follow up...My cholesterol is down to 111, my resting heart rate down to 68 (from 98), triglycerides are down to 83, and BMI down from 61 to 40!”


If these success stories match your personal goals, know that all of this is possible. These are all real weight loss success stories from patients of Dr. Metz who have gone through bariatric surgery and come out stronger and better on the other side.

Your weight loss journey does not begin or end with bariatric surgery. It involves a clear plan, dedicated effort, and permanent lifestyle changes that will ultimately give you back your health. With the help of our expert team and your own personal grit, you can have a success story just like these patients.

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Dating after Bariatric Surgery: Volume 1

“Bob. Single, professional, 42 y.o., 5’9”, 227 pounds (down from 320 pounds since my VSG last year!), likes long walks on the beach and golden retrievers.”

Would you swipe yes or no? I suppose it depends on the circumstances.

Many of my patients have asked me when they should start dating after bariatric surgery. A subset of those patients have asked how and when to tell others that they have undergone a weight loss procedure. The answer is highly personal, and demands an in-depth discussion of the various approaches.

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Why is weight a casual topic of conversation?

“Did you stop working out?” a co-worker asked me last week in the hospital cafeteria. “You look way too skinny,” said a colleague in the O.R. to me a few months ago.  “You used to look a lot stronger,” a former co-resident said to me at a national meeting of Bariatric surgeons.

Sound familiar? Anyone ever come up to you at work and remark on your weight going up or down? Since when did our weight become an appropriate point of discussion with acquaintances? Okay, so I used to be a lot heavier, and my weight has fluctuated over the years, just like everyone else’s, but what the heck?

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